Using Brackets in Adaptive Notation

DailyCues.com makes use of an adaptive notation system so that pronunciation examples appear according to preferences set by the user. By using simple code in the article a word and its pronunciation can be shown (e.g., pat /pppæăattt/). The slashes around the pronunciation indicate a fairly broad transcription is used. In other words, just the building blocks are shown. 

Sometimes it is necessary to add more detail by provideing a more narrow transcritption that may have information about how a word is produced in speech [XXXXæăattt] (e.g., /p/ may be accompanied by a puff of air at the beginning of a word). In this case, it is customary to use brackets around the pronunciation to indicate that a phonetic transcription is provided. 

Below is the code to include adaptive transcritption in articles:

Code Description How It Appears
//p// Double slashes around IPA /ppp/
//pæt// Double slashes around IPA /pppæăattt/
//pʰ// Double slashes around IPA with an asterisk inside right slashes [XXXX]
//pʰæt// Double slashes around IPA with an asterisk inside right slashes [XXXXæăattt]

Note: The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) must be used in the coding of examples which will then appear in articles according to user preferences.

External Links

  • Type IPA This website allows you to type IPA symbols to cut and past into articles. It is a fast an deasy way to code examples in the iQpedia.
  • Wikipedia displays phonetic diacritics that can be cut and pasted (e.g., aspiration)