Cued American English Competency Screening-Expressive

Purpose

The purpose of the CAECS-E is to evaluate the candidate’s basic cued English skills – to determine if you can cue single words and sentences. This test evaluates handshape and placement accuracy, rhythm, prosody, connected discourse, and form.

Format

The CAECS-E is offered through the mail. The candidate sends the fee and application to the TECUnit. The candidate provides the name of a proctor. Written material is sent to that proctor who oversees the candidates testing. The candidate cues the written material while being videotaped. The tape is sent to the TECUnit for rating.

The test material is divided into three sections. The first two sections are comprised of single words. The final section is made up of sentences.

Speed is not measured by the CAECS-E, nor does speed affect one’s rating. However, the candidate is evaluated on his/her ability to produce natural rhythm while cueing English. Cueing the sentences slowly does not reduce one’s score, but cueing a sentence in a choppy manner or with incorrect stress would.

Candidates receive 6 subscores from the CAECS-E:

  • Vowel Accuracy
  • Consonant Accuracy
  • Handshape-Placement Accuracy
  • Form
  • Prosody
  • Discourse

Vowel Accuracy

While cueing single words, the candidate’s cueing is evaluated based on vowel accuracy alone.

Consonant Accuracy

While cueing single words, the candidate’s cueing is evaluated based on consonant accuracy alone.

Handshape-Placement Accuracy

While cueing single words, the candidate is evaluated in terms of both consonant and vowel accuracy. Additionally, the candidate is evaluated by his/her ability to combine handshapes and placements into cued segments (i.e. consonant-vowel segments represented as handshape + placement/movement).

Form

The candidate is evaluated on his/her expressive clarity. This subscore is negatively impacted by handshapes that are only partially rendered, the candidate’s failure to touch vowel placements, inaccurate transitions between cues, extraneous movements, and an inconsistent side placement.

Prosody

For this score, the candidate is evaluated by his/her ability to model visual prosodic elements of cued discourse. These elements include mood, inflection, and prominence (stress at the syllable and word level).

Discourse

The candidate is given a score based on his/her ability to produce cues with natural rhythm. This subscore is negatively impacted by choppy, halting cueing, and pausing within words.

Scoring

These subscores are averaged to yield the candidates overall score. The overall score determines the candidate’s overall level.

Range of Scores Level TECUnit Description
3.4-4.0 Acceptable The testee performs satisfactorily at the word and sentence level.The applicant performs consistently in areas of form, vowel accuracy, consonant-vowel constructions, sentence-level discourse, and the inclusion of prosodic information like stress, prominence, and question forms. The testee should strive to maintain the aspects of his/her expressive performance which are in accordance with the accepted standards of cued American English. Applicants who received a score under 4.0 should continue developing skills in order to eliminate the errors indicated in the Errors Analysis Report.
2.7-3.3 Developing The testee demonstrates many components of cued American English correctly. However, the testee omits and/or incorrectly models several essential aspects of cued English in at least four of the following areas: form, vowel accuracy, consonant-vowel constructions, sentence-level discourse, and the inclusion of prosodic information like stress, prominence, and question forms. The testee should continue to advance his/her expressive cueing skills. At this level, testee’s performance is generally better at the word level, deteriorating at the sentence and discourse level. The omission and/or incorrect modeling of cueing mechanics at this level does not necessarily indicate that the cuer is unaware of these elements, but that he/she is unable to demonstrate these multiple tasks cohesively. The cuer should continue training in order to learn appropriate standards of cued English as necessary, and strive to synthesize these essential elements to render cued discourse fully and accurately.
2.0-2.6 Emerging The testee demonstrates some components of cued American English, but also exhibits frequent and consistent common errors. The applicant omitted and/or incorrectly modeled several essential aspects of cued English in the majority of these areas: form, vowel accuracy, consonant-vowel constructions, sentence-level discourse, and the inclusion of prosodic information like stress, prominence, and question forms. The testee is advised to attend appropriate training with a qualified instructor of cued American English. The cuer should devote regular practice time to cueing at a relatively slower rate in order to correct common errors, extraneous movements, and/or omitted elements.
1.0-1.9 Inaccurate The testee demonstrates few components of cued American English and exhibits numerous and consistent errors in nearly all of the following areas: form, vowel accuracy, consonant-vowel constructions, sentence-level discourse, and the inclusion of prosodic information like stress, prominence, and question forms. The testee is advised to undergo appropriate training with a qualified instructor of cued American English and utilize appropriate training materials to re-learn basic cueing mechanics.
<1.0 Not-Rateable The testee’s cueing contains too little accurate information to diagnose errors or prescribe corrective measures. The testee is advised to attend an introductory course conducted by a qualified cued language instructor.

There is no passing score for the CAECS-E. However, a minimum score or level may be required by personnel departments, school districts, or state agencies. A score between 3.4 and 4.0 (“Acceptable” level) is the prerequisite for a candidate to register for the Cued Language Transliterator National Certification Examination (CLTNCE).